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Topic: Lasting Power of Attorney


  • Jerzy (George) Kujawinski - Private Client
    Lasting Power of Attorney: do your parents need one?
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    LPA is short for “Lasting Power of Attorney”.  They were actually intended for use by younger people, but in reality they have really become essential when looking after elderly parents. The key point to realise is that there is no automatic right for your next of kin to take financial or health decisions on your… Learn more

  • Kate Godber - Wills, Probate, LPA, Tax and Trusts
    Lasting Powers of Attorney – What You Need to Know
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    Many people believe once they have completed and had their LPA registered they need not review it and can leave it in the drawer for safe keeping. This is not the case. As those with LPAs shall know, these documents are regulated by a government body called the Office of the Public Guardian or ‘OPG’… Learn more

  • Emma Fuller - Wills, Probate and LPA
    A guide to Lasting Power Of Attorney
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    A guide to Lasting Power Of Attorney   What are LPAs for and what do they consist of? There are two types of Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) : Personal LPAs – Health & Care Decisions and Financial Decisions Business LPAs LPA’s act as a safety net in the event that you lose mental capacity… Learn more

  • Aimee Pyrah - Residential Conveyancing
    Bank Accounts and Mental Capacity
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    Bank Accounts and Mental Capacity   When discussing Lasting Powers of Attorneys (LPAs) with my clients, I am often asked if they are necessary. Surely if you have a joint bank account with your partner, a financial LPA is not needed? The assumption is that if you lose mental capacity then your nominated relative has… Learn more

  • Aimee Pyrah - Residential Conveyancing
    Power Of Attorney
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    Power Of Attorney A power of attorney is a legal document that allows a person to assign another to act on their behalf. This person is known as the donor. The donor will see a solicitor to draft an arrangement by assigning an individual or multiple people to act on their behalf under certain circumstances,… Learn more

  • Lisa Dave - Family Law, Wills, LPA and Probate
    What is an LPA and should I have one?
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    LPA is short for “Lasting Power of Attorney”.  Whilst these are most used in later life, the intention when they were introduced was that they were aimed at much younger generations.  Many people do not understand what these are and why it is important to have one. The key point to realise is that there… Learn more

  • EHL Wills Team
    Lasting Powers of Attorney – what are the different types?
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    Lasting Powers of Attorney (or LPAs) take two different forms, and whilst it is advisable to have both you could just have one type if that is more appropriate for you. Lasting Power of Attorney for Property and Financial Affairs – This power allows the attorney to deal with the finances, banking, bills, stocks, shares and… Learn more

  • Emma Fuller - Wills, Probate and LPA
    Client Interview – I knew I could trust Emma to confidently deal with the LPA
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    Solicitor Emma Fuller is based at the Loughborough solicitors branch who specialises in Wills & Probate, Administration of Estates, Elderly Client Work and Family Law. She has extensive experience across a wide range of services within these areas including drafting Wills and Codicils, advising on IHT issues, joint property and possible severance of tenancy. Here,… Learn more

  • EHL Wills Team
    Why Estate Planning is Important
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    Whatever age you are, there are plenty of reasons to start planning your estate. You might have children or other dependants, or a partner you would want to be financially comfortable in the event of your death. You might own assets, a house, or financial products including life assurance, all of which will need to… Learn more

  • Emma Fuller - Wills, Probate and LPA
    Can an Attorney under a Lasting Power of Attorney retire?
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    The short answer is yes; an Attorney is entitled to resign at any point for any reason.  No-one is compelled to take on the role of an Attorney as the position is a voluntary one.  Whilst many LPAs remain in place for lifetime and are very valuable documents for the family, there are some situations… Learn more

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