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  • EHL Conveyancing Team
    Covenants for title
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      Covenants in Title   We are often asked what the difference is between full and limited title guarantee as this is referred to in Contracts relating to property. On completion of a transaction the Contract merges with the purchase deed in so far as the two documents cover the same ground and in general… Learn more

  • Kate Godber - Wills, Probate, LPA, Tax and Trusts
    Declaration of Trust for jointly owned rental properties
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    Did you know?   If you own a rental property with your spouse or civil partner but you don’t split the income equally between you both, there is a dedicated tax form to let HMRC know.   Usually, the shares of a property between two or more people are written in a “Declaration of Trust”:… Learn more

  • Lisa Dave - Family Law, Wills, LPA and Probate
    Why do you have to re-register the birth of your child?
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    Why do you have to re-register the birth of your child? There are two reasons as to why you would do this: – To add the name of the father onto the birth certificate, whether by choice or due to a Court Order; If the parents have married since the birth of their child. Point… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    What is defamation?
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    We are often asked for advice in respect of defamation claims, but what is defamation?  Defamation is a false accusation or malicious representation of someone’s words or actions.  The law surrounding this area aims to protect an individual’s reputation from these accusations or misrepresentations. The way we assess whether a client has a potential claim… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    Jury Service – No longer Just 12 Angry Men
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    Social media and the law seem to be causing many issues for users of Twitter and Facebook but recently it is in the jury room where social media is causing a stir. Two former jurors were found guilty of contempt of court for internet use and have been sentenced to 2 months in prison. Kasim… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    What is Intellectual Property?
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    Intellectual property is the creations of the mind to which exclusive rights can be given. Intellectual property law these rights can be granted on to non-physical things such as music, art, literacy, inventions, designs, discoveries and even words and phrases like L’Oreal Paris’ “Because You’re Worth It”. The common types of intellectual property include copyright,… Learn more

  • Faye Williamson - Family Law
    When child contact breaks down
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    In the best situations everyone hopes that the separation of their parents will have the least possible effect on the children and their ongoing relationship with both mother and father. Despite the breakdown of their personal relationship parents are supposed to put that aside and help the children keep in contact. This can be very… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    What should I do before I sign an employment contract?
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    Being offered a new job is for most people the end of a long road. With soaring unemployment levels and minimal growth on the economy many people are looking for work and when they are offered a job can be tempted to take it without quibbling over the terms. This is understandable but if you’ve… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Employee Shareholders Scheme is debated by Parliament
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    A new employee shareholder scheme is currently being debated by parliament. The idea is an employee is given shares worth between £2000 and £50,000 in their employer which is exempt from Capital Gains Tax. In exchange an employee will give up certain employment law rights including, redundancy pay, the right to claim Unfair Dismissal, right… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    Limitation – how long do you have to make a claim?
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    When considering whether to bring a claim against an opponent in court it is vital to keep in mind the time period within which a claim can be made.  These time periods are governed by the Limitation Act 1980 (“the Act”) meaning action against an opponent must be issued at court within the relevant time… Learn more

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