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Topic: Employees


  • Impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
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      Impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a regulation introduced by the European Union (Regulation 2016/679) on 8 April 2016. It will be automatically incorporated into UK legislation from 25 May 2018. The decision for the UK to leave the European Union will not affect the… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Blue Monday – The most depressing day of the year for your employees
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    Today has been dubbed blue Monday, the most depressing day of the year. If your employees aren’t applying for divorce or weighing up their overdrafts they may well be considering a change in career. Traditionally blue Monday sees a large number of employees take the decision to change profession or job in pursuit of pastures… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    GTA Flu expected to hit workers
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    With the launch of the much anticipated Grand Theft Auto 5, it is expected a large number of employees will be struck with GTA Flu. With symptoms ranging from acute fatigue through to bruised thumbs, it is expected a number of employees across the country will call in sick in order to play the video… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Potential changes to TUPE
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    The Transfer of Undertakings Regulations is one of the most complex areas of employment law and can lead to confusion and frustration for smaller employer’s wishing to transfer staff. Regulation 11 of TUPE requires an employer who is transferring employees to provide certain limited employee liability information 14 days before a TUPE transfer. The regulation… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    The Data Protection Act and Employee Data – what happens?
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    Any employer who processes the personal data (names, telephone numbers, addresses and job titles) by holding, using or disclosing the data will be subject to the Data Protection Act 2008. The Data Protection Act requires an employer to be registered with the Information Commissioners Office and for the informed consent of Employees to be obtained… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Draft order published to Cap Unfair Dismissal Awards at 12 months’ pay
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      Following changes to legislation in 2012 requiring employees employed after 5 April 2012 to be employed for 2 years before having a right to claim Unfair Dismissal, the government has now announced it does intend to cap the amount of compensation available to employees at the lower of 52 weeks’ pay or the current… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Lay-offs and Short time working
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    When a business does not have enough business for all its employees instead of making employees redundant an employer may ‘lay-off’ employees or put an employee on to short-time working; the employee will work shorter hours than usual and will get paid less than half a normal week’s pay. A ‘lay-off’ may not always be… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Penalty Notices for Employers
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    New legislation due to come into force sometime after October 2013 will allow Tribunals to Order the Employer to pay between £100 to £5000 to the secretary of state where an aggravating factor is involved in the breach.  The fine will be halved if paid within 21 days. What amounts to aggravating factors remains unclear… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    I think I’ve been dismissed unfairly – what do I do?
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    A dismissal could be deemed as unfair if you were dismissed without a reason or without using the correct and formal dismissal procedure. There are also other situations where your dismissal could be classed as unfair can include: If you requested flexible working hours If you refused to give up your rights with regard to… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    23% of Britain’s major employers now use zero-hour contracts for staff.
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    The number of major employers in Britain using zero-hour contracts for staff has risen to almost a quarter. A study by the Workplace Employment Relations found that firms using some zero-hour contracts have risen from 4% in 2004 to 23% in 2011. Having a zero-hour contract denies workers regular hours and basic terms and conditions… Learn more


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