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Topic: Employment Law


  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Employee Shareholders – what you need to know about the possible changes
    by

    The Growth and Infrastructure Bill looks set to continue through parliament. The aim is to create Employee shareholders who in return for receiving £2000 or more in shares from their Employer, give up their entitlement to certain employment law rights including: The right to claim Unfair Dismissal; The right to receive redundancy payments; The right… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    Sir Alex Ferguson Commences Retirement
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      Anyone with even a passing interest in sport, business or man-management will be aware Sir Alex Ferguson has announced his retirement from football management.  Prior to his retirement Sir Alex had been at the helm of Manchester United since 1986, leading the club through its strongest period of domestic and European success.  Sir Alex… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Number of Young Workers on Zero Hours Contracts Doubles
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    The Office of National Statistics has released figures showing that the number of 16-24 year-olds on zero hour contracts has more than doubled since the start of the recession. These contracts give no guarantee of regular hours or pay. This allows businesses to offer extra shifts during busy periods, but offer no work whatsoever when… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Whistleblowing – where is the public interest?
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    For some the protection afforded to employees when blowing the whistle on dubious practices operated by their employer is important as it encourages employees to disclose wrongdoing of their employer without the fear of suffering detriment or being dismissed.   However the current legislation does not require the protected disclosure to be in the public… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    Employment Tribunal Fees Introduced in a bid to cut “unnecessary” claims
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    Historically applications to the Employment Tribunal have been exempt from fees although the County and High Courts have made use of a fee paying system for some time.  Whilst a ‘free service’ for Claimants has meant access to the judicial system for all employees regardless of their income, it has also given rise to Claimants… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Should you get minimum wage on an internship?
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    Most workers in England and Wales of school leaver’s age and above are entitled to receive the National Minimum Wage currently £3.68 for those under 18.  However a number of companies offer ‘unpaid internships’ which provide experience to interns without remuneration. Several of these companies are currently being investigated to see if they are breaching… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    What makes a strike legal
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    For a strike to be fair it must be an official strike endorsed by a Trade Union. The requirements for a strike to be official were tightened during the 1980s and 1990s meaning strikes are far less frequent than they use to be. Further, any strike that lasts for over 12 days will not be… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Minimum Wage to Increase
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    From October 2013 the National minimum wage is to rise to £6.31 for adults (a rise of 12p) and £5.03 for 18-20 year olds (a rise 5p). The rate for apprentices is also to rise by 3p. The National Minimum wage is the amount an employee must be paid. Employers that employ staff on a… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    Increase in Employment Vacancies
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    The BBC is reporting a 19 month high in employment vacancies opening up in the UK and it is hoped these vacancies are a sign the economy will see a continued increase in activity that may drive the country out of a difficult economic climate. The 19 month high comes as a result of 3… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    Librarian at Oxford University Dismissed for Harlem Shake
    by

      A librarian at Oxford University has become the latest victim of the Harlem Shake resulting in disciplinary action. Earlier this month a group of Australian miners were sacked for performing the Harlem Shake and a teacher at Caldicot Comprehensive was suspended. The Librarian at Oxford University appears to have been dismissed for allowing a… Learn more

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