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  • Rebecca Gunn - Residential Conveyancing
    What are the practical issues with Leasehold property?
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    Flats and apartments are typically leasehold, and in recent years we are seeing a growing number of new build houses being sold as leasehold properties. These are some of the common issues relevant to any leasehold property: 1.      Description of the property: The exact extent of the property will be set out in the lease,… Learn more

  • Faye Williamson - Family Law
    When child contact breaks down
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    In the best situations everyone hopes that the separation of their parents will have the least possible effect on the children and their ongoing relationship with both mother and father. Despite the breakdown of their personal relationship parents are supposed to put that aside and help the children keep in contact. This can be very… Learn more

  • Faye Williamson - Family Law
    Should I have a pre-nup?
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    A prenuptial is a formal agreement entered into by a couple before they get married. It secures what they have agreed will happen to any assets in the case of a divorce. Both parties can agree that the wealthier partner does not suffer a 50% loss of assets. This is especially good to have if… Learn more

  • Faye Williamson - Family Law
    How do I change my name?
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    Your name can be changed at any point in your life, for any reason, provided it is not to defraud or deceive another person. To change a name, there is not a legal procedure to follow; you simply just start by using your new name. Forenames and surnames can be changed, along with the adding… Learn more

  • Emma Fuller - Wills, Probate and LPA
    Gifting money to charity in your Will
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      With the great EHL and LOROS marathon cycle ride from Leicester to Skegness less than 24 hours away please do not hesitate to use the link on our website to sponsor our intrepid team. They’ve all been burning up the roads in training for this 86 mile endurance event. I’m sure they will all be… Learn more

  • Rebecca Gunn - Residential Conveyancing
    Should I buy a Leasehold or Freehold property?
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    In English property law there are two main estates in land, Leasehold and Freehold.  Many people are confused as to the distinction between the two and worry that if they are buying a Leasehold property that their rights are somehow less than that if they were buying a Freehold property. When you buy a Freehold… Learn more

  • Rebecca Gunn - Residential Conveyancing
    What happens if I buy a house with my partner before we are married?
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    We see a large proportion of first time buyers who are not (yet) married, which throws up some interesting legal points for them. When setting up home with a partner we suggest that clients consider the points below, and have an open discussion about their intentions for the future: 1. Owning the property in joint names:… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    I have obtained a county court judgment against a debtor and he hasn’t paid, how can I get the money?
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    We are contacted by many people who have successfully obtained a county court judgment but the debtor simply will not pay.  The most common question we are asked is ‘how can I get the money?’ The good news is that there are many options available.  This is known as ‘enforcement’ of the judgment.  It is… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    What should I do before I sign an employment contract?
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    Being offered a new job is for most people the end of a long road. With soaring unemployment levels and minimal growth on the economy many people are looking for work and when they are offered a job can be tempted to take it without quibbling over the terms. This is understandable but if you’ve… Learn more

  • Faye Williamson - Family Law
    What do the changes to child maintanence mean for you and your children?
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      In December 2012 there were changes made to the definition of a qualifying child. A qualifying child is a child that maintenance must be paid for. Previously to December 2012 a qualifying child was one who was under 16, or under 19 and still in full time education (not higher than A-level equivalent). The… Learn more

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