Home > Legal Articles > Increased Probate Fees from April 2019

Topic: Probate


  • Leanne Hathaway - Tax and Trusts
    Increased Probate Fees from April 2019
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    The Government announced that there will be substantial changes to the level of probate fees being introduced from April 2019. The new legislation will raise the estate value threshold from £5,000 to £50,000, which will exclude around 25,000 estates from probate fees altogether. However, estates worth more than £50,000 will see an increased fee with… Learn more

  • EHL Conveyancing Team
    Selling a property through Probate or Lasting Powers of Attorney
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    Selling a property through Probate, or Lasting Power Of Attorney. Top Facts about Probate Sales; Technically you cannot sell a property before the probate is granted, unless your name is already on the deed. The Probate takes around eight weeks to come back and if you sell your house in the meantime this could hold… Learn more

  • Kate Godber - Wills, Probate, LPA, Tax and Trusts
    Probate Fees to increase
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    Probate Fees to Increase Probate Fees have been charged at a flat rate of £155 (the Court Application fees) but this is changing to a value based charge, depending on the value of the estate. From the 1st May the application fee will depend upon the value of the estate: Estate Worth Application Fee £50,000.00… Learn more

  • Left out of a Will?
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    Leaving someone out of a Will may be a deliberate choice, but can also be due to changes in circumstances since a Will was written, or be the consequence of a mistake in how the Will was drafted.  Those who are named in a Will are known as Beneficiaries, and in the majority of Wills… Learn more

  • Elizabeth Ince - Wills and Probate
    Probate and what to do when someone dies
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    When a person dies, first thoughts are to ensure that funeral arrangements are made and there are practical issues to be dealt with, perhaps if there are pets to be cared for. Beyond that, it is necessary for someone to obtain the legal right to deal with their property, money and possessions (which is known… Learn more

  • EHL Wills Team
    Why Estate Planning is Important
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    Whatever age you are, there are plenty of reasons to start planning your estate. You might have children or other dependants, or a partner you would want to be financially comfortable in the event of your death. You might own assets, a house, or financial products including life assurance, all of which will need to… Learn more

  • Kate Godber - Wills, Probate, LPA, Tax and Trusts
    Are trusts subject to Probate?
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    This is a recurring question that requires some explanation. Firstly, what is a Grant of Probate? This is a document that needs to be applied for by executors named in a Will once the Testator (the person who made the Will) has died. The Grant of Probate gives the executors the necessary legal document to administer the estate in… Learn more

  • Emma Fuller - Wills, Probate and LPA
    Do you always need a Grant of Probate when someone dies?
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              You don’t normally need a grant of probate if the estate either: passes to the surviving spouse/civil partner because it was held in joint names, e.g. a savings account and doesn’t include land, property or shares You should contact the organisation holding the money, e.g. the bank or building society. They… Learn more

  • EHL Wills Team
    What is the Probate process?
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    Following the death of a loved one the prospect of administering their estate may seem daunting and the legal process intimidating. A common question relates to the term Probate which from time to time can be misunderstood. What is Probate                 Probate itself is a formal approval of… Learn more

  • Lisa Dave - Family Law, Wills, LPA and Probate
    Probate – Time scale for reporting to HMRC
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    Where an estate is not an “excepted estate” (this is one which is free of Inheritance Tax and within certain tolerances as to size), the Personal Representative (PR) must deliver an account to HMRC within twelve months of the end of the month in which the deceased died, or within three months of taking up… Learn more

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