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Topic: Wills


  • Leanne Hathaway - Tax and Trusts
    How do I make a Will?
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    For most people, making a will is a way to make sure loved ones are looked after when they are no longer around. You can still decide what happens to your money, possessions and property when you are no longer around through the power of a will. This also makes sure that you do not… Learn more

  • Emma Fuller - Wills, Probate and LPA
    What is probate?
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    ‘Probate’ is a term used commonly when discussing the right to handle a deceased person’s affairs. A ‘grant of representation’ may be applied for when someone dies, giving you the legal right to deal with their money, property and possessions, also known as their estate. This right to handle the estate is called ‘Probate’. Probate… Learn more

  • Emma Fuller - Wills, Probate and LPA
    Why should I make a Will and specify my wishes about my funeral arrangements in it?
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      It is always of benefit that you make a Will and in that Will your wishes about your funeral arrangements be written in that Will to avoid any disputes after your death. A detailed letter setting out your wishes can also be left with your Will. If this is not dealt with then who… Learn more

  • Leanne Hathaway - Tax and Trusts
    Second Marriages and Co-habitation: Wills, Trusts & Tax
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    Second marriages are becoming increasingly common.  Equally common is the situation where those that have previously been married choose to co-habit rather than marry again. Both can give rise to complex family situations which have all sorts of legal implications.  Even more important to review is the situation where the first marriage never legally ended… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    What is the time limit for bringing a claim against a deceased’s estate?
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    We are often instructed by clients to provide advice on bringing a claim against an estate after someone has passed away on the basis they require reasonable financial provision from the estate. Our first consideration in these matters is whether the client is within the relevant time period to make a claim.  This is known… Learn more

  • Andrew Robinson - Employment Law
    What happens when the court makes a Will for you?
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    For a will to be valid, the person making it must have the mental capacity to understand what they are doing and the consequences. Sometimes, for instance in Alzheimer’s cases, it is apparent that a person is not able to make a will for themselves. In these circumstances, a person may die without leaving a valid… Learn more

  • Emma Fuller - Wills, Probate and LPA
    Gifting money to charity in your Will
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      With the great EHL and LOROS marathon cycle ride from Leicester to Skegness less than 24 hours away please do not hesitate to use the link on our website to sponsor our intrepid team. They’ve all been burning up the roads in training for this 86 mile endurance event. I’m sure they will all be… Learn more

  • Paul Stubbs - Litigation
    Contested Probate and how to challenge a Will
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    Contentious Probate claims are one of the biggest areas of litigation and put simply, are claims challenging the validity of a will when the testator passes away and in some cases, the distribution of the assets in the testator’s estate. The effect of a contested probate claim on beneficiaries and executors cannot be underestimated and… Learn more

  • Leanne Hathaway - Tax and Trusts
    Deed of Family Arrangement
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      The difficulty faced by many is that Wills are only revisited from time to time, meaning that they can prove to be less tax efficient than anticipated when drafted. Family circumstances may also have changed, such that the Will is not as relevant as it may once have been. Deeds of Variation can be… Learn more

  • Leanne Hathaway - Tax and Trusts
    The role of a solicitor: mental capacity to draft a Will
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      A Court of Appeal decision has said that strong evidence is required to find that a testator lacks mental capacity to make a Will when an experienced solicitor had prepared the will and contemporaneously recorded the view that they had capacity (although in this case the will was invalid for other reasons) – Hawes… Learn more

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